The hatred of green vegetables begins in the womb! The children smile for the carrots but grimace for the cabbage

The hatred of green vegetables begins in the womb! 4D ultrasound scans reveal that babies smile when mom eats carrots, but grimaces when she chooses cabbage

  • The researchers performed scans of 100 pregnant women at 32 weeks and 36 weeks
  • The women had a carrot or cabbage capsule 20 minutes before the scan
  • The results showed that the children smiled after the carrot but grimaced after the cabbage
  • The findings suggest that what pregnant women eat could affect children’s tastes

While the idea of ​​a salad will make some people’s taste buds tingle, for others the idea of ​​chewing on a bowl of veggies sounds more like a punishment.

Now, a study has shown that babies start responding to different flavors while still in the womb.

Researchers at the University of Durham performed 4D ultrasound scans of 100 pregnant women to see how their unborn babies responded after being exposed to the flavors of the foods their mothers eat.

The results showed that the fetuses smiled shortly after their mothers ate the carrot, but winced when their mothers opted for cabbage.

The findings suggest that what pregnant women eat could affect their babies’ taste preferences after birth.

If this is the case, the findings could have implications for establishing healthy eating habits.

A smiling baby face

Researchers at the University of Durham performed 4D ultrasound scans of 100 pregnant women to see how their unborn babies responded after being exposed to the flavors of the foods their mothers eat. Left: neutral baby face, smiling baby face right

When women ate carrot, fetuses tended to smile at the scan (archive image)

When women ate carrot, fetuses tended to smile at the scan (archive image)

Are you a super taster?

To find out if you are a supertaster:

1. Darken your mouth by circling the red wine

2. Take a piece of writing paper with holes in the margin, which are about 6 mm in diameter

3. Poke a hole in your tongue and count the number of papillae – small fleshy protrusions – sticking out through

4. If you are under 15 you are a non-taster, if you have 15 to 30 taste buds you are a taster and anything over 30 means you are a supertaster

Poke a hole in your tongue and count the number of papillae - small fleshy protrusions - that poke through

Poke a hole in your tongue and count the number of papillae – small fleshy protrusions – that poke through

Previous studies have suggested that babies can smell and smell in the womb through inhaling and swallowing amniotic fluid.

However, these studies relied on postnatal outcomes.

Instead, the researchers tested whether babies can taste in the womb by evaluating their reactions to flavors before birth.

The team enrolled 100 pregnant women between the ages of 18 and 40 and performed 4D ultrasound scans at both 32 weeks and 36 weeks.

The women were given a single capsule 20 minutes before each scan containing 400 mg of carrot or 400 mg of kale powder and were asked not to consume other flavored foods or drinks that could affect the children’s reactions.

Meanwhile, some women in a control group had neither capsule.

The results revealed that a small amount of carrot or kale flavor was enough to stimulate a reaction in the fetuses.

When women consumed the carrot, the fetuses tended to smile at the crawl, but when they consumed the cabbage capsule, the fetuses tended to grimace.

“It was really amazing to see the unborn babies’ reaction to the cabbage or carrot flavor during the scans and to share those moments with their parents,” said lead author Beyza Ustun.

The findings suggest that a range of chemical stimuli pass through the maternal diet into the fetal environment, according to Professor Benoist Schaal of the University of Burgundy, co-author of the study.

A neutral girl

A child who makes a face

The results revealed that a small amount of carrot or kale flavor was enough to stimulate a reaction in the fetuses. Left: a neat child, right: a child wincing

When women consumed the cabbage capsule, the fetuses tended to grimace (archive image)

When women consumed the cabbage capsule, the fetuses tended to grimace (archive image)

“This could have important implications for our understanding of the development of our taste and smell receptors and related perception and memory,” he said.

The findings suggest that what pregnant women eat could affect their babies’ taste preferences after birth.

“Consequently, we think this repeated exposure to flavors before birth can help establish food preferences after delivery, which may be important when thinking about messages about healthy eating and the potential to avoid” food fussiness. ” “during weaning,” Miss Ustun added.

The team has now started a follow-up study with the same babies after birth, to see if their reactions to food in the womb are the same now.

Professor Jackie Bliessett of the University of Aston, co-author of the study, concluded: ‘It could be argued that repeated exposures to prenatal aromas can lead to preferences for those flavors experienced after birth.

“In other words, exposing the fetus to less ‘liked’ flavors, such as cabbage, could mean that it gets used to those flavors in the womb.

“The next step is to examine whether fetuses show less ‘negative’ responses to these flavors over time, resulting in greater acceptance of those flavors when babies first taste them outside the womb.”

MICROBIOMES: CONTROL EVERYTHING?

Researchers now estimate that a typical human body is made up of around 30 trillion human cells and 39 trillion bacteria.

These are vital for gathering energy from our food, regulating our immune function, and keeping the lining of our gut healthy.

Interest in and knowledge of the microbiota has recently exploded as we now recognize how essential they are to our health.

A healthy and balanced microbiome helps us break down food, protects us from infections, trains our immune system and produces vitamins, such as K and B12.

It also sends signals to our brains that can affect mood, anxiety, and appetite.

Imbalances in the gut are increasingly linked to a number of conditions. Last year, scientists at the California Institute of Technology discovered the first-ever link between the gut and Parkinson’s symptoms.

The composition of our gut microbiota is partly determined by our genes, but it can also be influenced by lifestyle factors such as our diet, alcohol intake and exercise, as well as medications.

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